6 Best Type Of NBN Connections In Australia

Date:

In spite of the fact that there is only one National Broadband Network, there are a number of different technologies that can be used to deliver the service to your home.

There is a great deal of variation in the speed of NBN connections and the plan types available at your address depending on the type of NBN connection you have. For the most part, NBN connections fall into three categories: Fiber to the Premises (FTTP), Fiber to the Curb (FTTC), and Fiber to the Node (FTTN). In addition to satellite NBN, there are two types of internet usually available in regional areas: Hybrid Fiber Coaxial (HFC) and Fiber to the Building (FTTB).

Using existing network technology makes the difference between each type of connection. It might seem overwhelming to choose one of the different types of NBN connections, but Move-In Connect is here to help! Here is a quick guide to the best type of NBN connections in Australia.

 

Table Of Content

  • NBN Fiber To The Node – FTTN
  • NBN Fiber To The Building – FTTB
  • NBN Hybrid Fiber Coaxial – HFC
  • NBN Fiber To The Curb – FTTC
  • NBN Fixed Wireless 
  • NBN Satellite


  • NBN Fiber To The Node – FTTN

An FTTN connection does not feed directly into premises, as opposed to an FTTP connection. Fiber-optic lines are instead routed to a community-owned box or cabinet that is typically located at the end of a street or set of streets. The last section of the connection runs a signal into a property by using existing copper phone wiring. 

Australian households typically have FTTN connections, but they can also be slower than FTTP. Your internet connection may be slower if your house is further away from the NBN cabinet or box than your neighbors. Since FTTN uses copper cabling, speed is also limited. The fastest tier of NBN 100 is 100Mbps download speed.

  • NBN Fiber To The Building – FTTB

The NBN typically connects apartment blocks and big buildings through FTTB connections, which run down to their basements. Typically, fiber-optic cables are installed at the bottom of buildings and connected to fiber nodes. Once connected, the internet signals are sent to each apartment or unit within the building via existing cables. 

It is similar to FTTN in that your distance from the fiber node at the bottom of your building can affect your connection speed. Your NBN connection’s reliability can also be affected by the quality of your existing wires in the building.

  • NBN Hybrid Fiber Coaxial – HFC

It is possible to access an HFC connection if you already have a cable network or pay TV service. Running from the nearest fiber node, this connection uses your existing TV cable to connect your home to the NBN. At the point where the TV wire enters a property, an NBN technician needs to install an access network device in order to connect to an HFC connection.

HFC connections can vary in quality. While the technology can support NBN speeds up to 1000Mbps in theory, only 7% of HFC installations will reach that speed. The majority of HFC users should be able to sign up for a 250Mbps NBN plan.

  • NBN Fiber To The Curb – FTTC

FTTC is another option for connecting a property to a Distribution Point Unit (DPU) through existing copper wires. On a street, DPUs are usually placed inside telecommunications pits. Since copper wires are generally only a few meters long, FTTC can offer faster speeds than FTTN. There may be instances where you can perform self-installation. If you have an FTTC NBN box installed inside your property, this can be more feasible without the need for a technician

  •  NBN Fixed Wireless 

During peak periods, average speeds for Fired Wireless NBN can reach 75Mbps, but during the evening they often hover around 50Mbps because of congestion. NBN technicians are required to install both the outdoor antenna and an NBN connection box where the cable runs inside the antenna.

  • NBN Satellite

When it comes to NBN, satellite connection is another option for regional and remote Aussies. This type of NBN connection reaches remote areas more efficiently. For NBN satellite connections, a roof-mounted satellite dish needs to be installed by an NBN technician, as well as a modem supplied by the NBN. You can also get information about the What Is The Difference Between NBN & Wireless Network Connection?

Conclusion

If you live in a regional or rural area, your only option for connecting to the NBN is via a fixed wireless or satellite connection. In addition to the best type of NBN connection, its broad support for 250Mbps, HFC is the best alternative to FTTP. In other words, HFC is fast enough to handle even the most demanding users, and if you’re lucky, you may even be able to reach 1000Mbps speeds. FTTN, FTTB, and FTTC have the lowest heap. 

Hassan
I am a professional writer and blogger. I’m researching and writing about innovation, Entertainment, technology, business, and the latest digital marketing trends click here to go website.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Subscribe

spot_imgspot_img

Popular

More like this
Related

Why Trusted Online Casino Malaysia is the Best Choice for Gambling

It’s an easy, fun, and profitable way to spend...

Self Destructing NFTs

A self-destructing NFT has been created and is being...

What Are The Interesting thing in Sonic 2 Movie Review

If you're a fan of the original Sonic the...

Security Camera For Car While Parked: Useful Methods

Dash cams can be extremely useful in resolving certain...